Top 15 Soundtracks of Our Generation: 11-15

11) The Nightmare Before Christmas
I am so lucky this movie is not a Disney film. As far as animated movies go, Tim Burton’s “Nightmare Before Christmas” has the greatest soundtrack hands down. Jack the Pumpkin King is probably the only animated character I have ever related to. When he sings about filling the void in his life and not being whole on top of that escalator hill, you can actually connect with him. Overflowing with fun sing-a-longs and a dark hearty comedy that isn’t found in most children films, this movie and soundtrack are a perfect combination. The Boogie man and those 3 little sidekicks of his singing about capturing Santa Clause, Jack trying to find the missing link between Christmas and Halloween, and Jack stumbling into Christmas land are only a few of the jolly songs that this film has to offer.

12) I am Sam
I am Sam is the story of a mentally challenged father struggling to keep custody of his adorable daughter. Sam is infatuated with The Beatles, naming his daughter Lucy after the tune “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”. This soundtrack consists entirely of Beatles songs covered by artists of today. Rufus Wainwright’s “Across the Universe”, Sarah McLachlan’s “Blackbird”, The Black Crows “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”, Eddie Vedder’s “Hide Your Love Away”, and Nick Cave’s “Let it Be” are just a handful from the jam packed soundtrack. I am Sam is a touching movie that has an even more emotional soundtrack.

13) Trainspotting
Featuring some of the UK’s best unheard of acts and some established artists too, Trainspotting has it all. Iggy Pop starts the movie and soundtrack off perfectly with his “Lust for Life”, setting the atmosphere for an eclectic collection of new and old, generation crossing alternative rock. Mixing in some 80’s techno with New Order also adds diversity to an album that has a hard enough time getting into the stereo’s of unknowing listeners. Trainspotting is a movie entirely about the pitfalls of being a junkie living in Edinburgh in the early 90’s. Lou Reed, Blur, Pulp, and Primal Scream are a perfect fit for such an intense film.

14) Pulp Fiction
What makes Quentin Tarantino’s movie so incredible is not only his ability to create such captivating dialogue and extreme action sequences, but also his ability find truly remarkable music to fit perfectly into the theme of his movies. Pulp Fiction has without question the best soundtrack of any of Tarantino’s movies. John Travolta and Uma Thurman are twisting to Chuck Berry’s “You Can Never Tell”, Uma overdosing to Urge Overkill’s “Girl, You’ll Be a Woman Soon”, and Bruce Willis almost making his get away to The Startler Brothers’ “Flowers on the Wall”. Tarantino may not have picked the most modern music for his movie, but he certainly picked the most appropriate songs for an out of this world film that pushed the limits back in its day.

15) Dazed and Confused
An incredibly funny movie about the life’s of a bunch of high school kids in the 70’s. A wonderful collection of 70’s radio tunes that go fit flawlessly with the time setting of the movie. It seems to capture almost every genre of the time. Kiss, Deep Purple, Lynard Skynard, War, Black Sabbath and more make up the soundtrack of 70’s teen America. Basically the soundtrack of everyone who was in high school in 1974. If this isn’t enough classic rock for you, grab the second soundtrack “Even More Dazed and Confused”.

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~ by dtags21 on February 17, 2006.

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